Where does the hair used in a hair transplant come from?

Chattanooga, January 28, 2011– The hair that is used in most types of hair transplant procedures typically comes from either the sides of the head or the base of the scalp. According to Advanced Surgical Concepts’ Dr. James White, a cosmetic surgeon in Chattanooga, TN, the “ring of hair” that most men have during the final stages of hair loss is typically where much of the donor hair comes from.

Dr. White explains that a patient should expect to have his head looked at during a consultation in order to determine the density of the hair in the donor area and whether or not he would be an ideal candidate for a hair transplant procedure. At this same consultation appointment, Dr. White also discusses the specifics of the procedure and post-op instructions with the patient as well.

Although most people talk about men when discussing hair transplants, Dr. White says that women can have the procedure done too. For women specifically, Dr. White explains that the best way to go about a hair transplant is by opting for what is known as follicular unit extraction, or FUE. Using this method, a cosmetic surgeon would harvest a small amount of hair from a donor area and place it back in the needed area on an individual basis.

Rather than using the traditional strip method – which takes a strip of hair from one section of the head and places it somewhere else – follicular unit extraction is a procedure in which a cosmetic surgeon painstakingly removes individual hairs from one part of the head and transplants those hairs to the new area using very small, one-millimeter punches.

Among the many benefits of follicular unit extraction are a shorter recovery time and less scarring. Because patients who opt for follicular unit extraction don’t have large strips of hair that are taken out, their heads are likely to heal in a much faster, less noticeable way. Downtime with this procedure is minimal, and Dr. White estimates that most patients who have had follicular unit extraction were back on their feet and ready to get back to work within three or four days.

Although follicular unit extraction has caught on among both male and female patients in recent years, Dr. White says that the traditional strip method is sometimes still the preferred treatment option for men who have large areas of balding that need to be covered up. To find out specifically which option would be best, Dr. White recommends visiting his office for a complimentary consultation appointment.